Authentic Wonder

I was sitting in Cracker Barrel yesterday with Luik and saw a vintage Americana poster across the room. The aviation angle was the first thing to catch my eye: I’m a sucker for vintage-futurism.

But then I saw the quote:

“Transportation creates new wonders.”

Not everything new is awesome, just as not everything old is obsolete. This one little phrase made me realize a discrepancy in the way we find wonder today versus the way my grandparents’ generation did.

Today, we find wonder in the gadget, in the purchase, in the movie itself. And it usually ends there. Until we buy something new to “wonderize” us, the old becoming expendable. Just ask yourself how many cars, cell phones, and pairs of shoes you’ve cycled through in the last decade.

Had that poster been printed today, it would have read: “Transportation is wondrous.” Or better still: “This new car is wondrous; you need it.”

But back then, the purchase led to something altogether new. It was up to the user to create the intangible, undefinable experience, not the manufacturer.

The thing opened doors for new things to be created, new things to be experienced.

They channeled the pioneering American heartbeat to use the product to venture into uncharted territory. The goal was never for the product to be the end use of creativity. It was for the user to use their imagination to create something the manufacturer never could.

Wonder.

True wonder is not manufactured. It is spontaneous. Authentic. And never the same twice. Because it comes from something that can never be purchased.

For all our technology – which I believe is truly a gift from God to speed the power and efficiency of a creative Gospel – we must never lose our sense of imagination. An imagination that requires energy and work to initiate and sustain. An imagination that will always create wonder and never be satisfied with being told something finite it wondrous.

Dream, creators. Dream big. The do bigger. Heaven is backing you. ch:

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  • Dannal

    Very inspiring. Thank you.

  • Sue Kenney

    Very thought-provoking, Christopher. Yes, I can remember the days when wonder was not the item you held in your hand, or parked in your driveway, but what you did with it. And now I’m wondering myself: how did you explain all this thought to Luik? Sorry, just kidding. But living with you, I’m sure that boy is in for more than his share of imagination.

    • Luik just liked the plane and the not-so-futuristic looking cars. 😉 But, yes, he certainly has quite the imagination.

  • Beth Walrath

    One of my favorite quotes is “Don’t let anyone steal your dream”. Today it seems people forget how to dream.
    It’s our job to remind people it’s ok to dream & have an imagination. God made us visionaries, dreamers & creators. Yet, we all need to take the time to close our eyes & dream.